Rotary First Harvest | Discovering Food Justice: Under the Overgrown Garden
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Discovering Food Justice: Under the Overgrown Garden

25 Jul 2019, by firstharvest_in8rne in AmeriCorps VISTA, Harvest Against Hunger, OIC of Washington, Volunteering, Washington Site

Harvest VISTA Gleaning Coordinator VISTA Mary Pearl Ivy serves at OIC of Washington, a non-profit organization providing community services through federal, state and local funding sources. Mary Pearl’s focus is with the Emergency Food Assistance Program (TEFAP), which aims to supplement the diets of low-income Americans including the elderly by providing them with food and nutrition assistance at no cost. In addition to the farm to table communications for the food bank, Mary Pearl recruit’s volunteers to work within a community garden, in hopes of providing access to knowledge and resources for individuals to grow their own fresh foods.

Within the first couple weeks of her service, Mary Pearl hosted three large groups of volunteers to revive the completely grass encroached community garden; and the results were mind-blowing. What started as a hands-on volunteer opportunity, with some games and a snack turned into a dialogue about food justice and social justice! The three groups of students with Quo’s Discovery Washington program visited OIC in addition to local orchards and organizations in the community. They were introduced to the concept of migrant workers in the field and wanted to know more about where their food comes from and what it means for a community to have food insecurity. The VISTA asked one of her colleagues that works with the National Farm Workers Association to come in and speak on the opportunities that they provide, as well as his own experiences in the field. The attentive observations and inputs that these seventh graders had to share were inspiring. One of the teachers even mentioned that the world was not giving youth enough credit.

The VISTA was especially touched when the students asked to stay and work in the garden longer. The students were plotting ways to help fundraise, stop food insecurity, and misconceptions in this community and their own. After all their hard work in the garden, it is now open enough to host younger groups of volunteers as well as community members. Thanks, Que for connecting us to these amazing, hardworking students and teachers!

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