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Colorado

Nourishing Young Minds with Nutrition and Service Learning

07.03.2019 in AmeriCorps VISTA, Colorado, Community Food Share, Harvest Against Hunger, National Site

Harvest Against Hunger VISTA Malik Salsberry serves at Community Food Share, a nonprofit located in Louisville, CO. This nonprofit is one of the five Feeding America food banks that help to serve all of Colorado and Wyoming, with Community Food Share’s focus being Boulder and Broomfield counties. This nonprofit makes its distinction from other food banks in the area by having a major focus on fresh produce and protein, with goals of 75% being fresh produce, fruits and vegetables, and protein sources, like fresh milk, eggs, beans, and meat. Community Food Share supports other area food pantries as well as their own programs which serve different populations like children and the elderly.

Even though snow continues to come down on the Front Range in Colorado the growing season is fast approaching and preparations are well underway. As more people are getting antsier to start gardening outside the Harvest Against Hunger VISTA, Malik Salsberry, saw some of that same enthusiasm in the students at the Bixby School in Boulder, CO.

According to Laura Porpora, Bixby’s Gifted and Learning Specialist, “Bixby School is committed to educating the whole child, and that includes nourishing food from our own garden. Our school chef, Amber, incorporates freshly picked vegetables into wholesome meals for pre-school through fifth grade students. Our gardening coordinator, Nifer, tends to 3,000 square feet of garden beds with a variety of produce like tomatoes, squash, and beans.”

With the help of some teacher’s the students eagerly jumped into their service learning curriculum as well as the seed sorting activity that was explained to them by the Harvest Against Hunger VISTA. Teachers and students worked together to organize around 7,500 seed packets that were donated to Community Food Share from a local seed producer, Renee’s Garden and would go to benefit several vital programs and events. While the school still had class during the day to fuel the education of the 30 students that were involved many were able to take time to learn about the seed sorting activity, why they were sorting them, and who it would benefit overall.

The VISTA was excited to help work with the students and help facilitate along with the staff as the activity was explained and goals were set. The students organized the seeds by type of seeds, whether they were vegetables, fruit, herbs, or flowers, and sorted them by type of vegetable. The staff and students were even organizing down to the different kinds of beans, tomatoes, and kales that were donated. The Bixby students also worked with the bilingual seed packets that were donated that will be used to help Community Food Share’s bilingual and Spanish speaking participants. This part of the activity also gave the students a chance to learn the Spanish names of their favorite fruits and veggies.

The main use for the organized seeds is to use them for programs that encourage community members to get involved with their garden and give them some resources to start. The Harvest Against Hunger VISTA has worked with the Master Gardeners of Boulder County to find channels to give out the seed packets and spark interest in gardening, including a class for starting plants by seed, tabling events where we give out seeds to pantry participants, and giving out seeds to the community and non-profit gardens. Another function for some of the seeds is to help with the Bixby School gardens which are used as a teaching tool throughout their curriculum and to provide students with fresh produce for school lunches.

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Family Ties Stay Strong with Giving

23.01.2019 in AmeriCorps VISTA, Colorado, Food Bank, Harvest Against Hunger, National Site

Harvest Against Hunger VISTA Malik Salsberry serves at Community Food Share, a nonprofit located in Louisville, CO. This nonprofit is one of the five Feeding America food banks that help to serve all of Colorado and Wyoming, with Community Food Share’s focus being Boulder and Broomfield counties. This nonprofit makes its distinction from other food banks in the area by having a major focus on fresh produce and protein, with goals of 75% being fresh produce, fruits and vegetables, and protein sources, like fresh milk, eggs, beans, and meat. Community Food Share supports other area food pantries as well as their own programs which serve different populations like children and the elderly.

While snow continues to fall in the foothills of Boulder, CO, that hasn’t slowed down any of the planning that’s going into next seasons farms and gardens, especially regarding plans to host new gleaning opportunities. As the planning stage intensifies, plans for hosting gleans has turned into a family tradition for a long time Boulder family; the Munson’s.

This family tradition of two-fold giving, donating fresh produce to food banks and pantries while hosting gleaning opportunities for local nonprofits, was first started by the co-owners’ father, Robert Munson. Although Bob was an electrical engineer by trade and built a long and successful career, his childhood of working on his family’s farm in Illinois grew into a new found love for raising crops.

Bob started Munson Farms in 1976 with the help of his wife and children, cultivating not only his passion for farming but also his passion for giving back to the community, as he planted extra crops just for these donation efforts. Bob and his sons, Mike and Chris, would continue growth by building their own farm stands to help bring in additional income to the farm. Bob continued to give annually to Community Food Share and other local nonprofits whose missions involved helping their fellow neighbor, giving over one million pounds of produce to Community Food Share since 1982 and providing a variety of gleans to community members.

Like father like son, even building his own career in electrical engineering, Mike has made it a personal mission to continue with his father’s work on the farm and giving back to Community Food Share and other local nonprofits.

The partnership between Munson Farms and Community Food Share continues and plans are being made for donations and gleaning opportunities this season, including donations of their famous sweet corn, squash, pumpkins, peas, and other produce. Mike is excited to continue providing the same opportunities that his father did; providing nutritious produce for community members in need and gleaning opportunities for volunteers.

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Master Gardeners at Community Food Share in CO

26.07.2018 in AmeriCorps VISTA, Colorado, Food Bank, Harvest Against Hunger, National Site, Volunteering

Harvest Against Hunger VISTA Brianna Nash serves at Community Food Share, a member food bank of the national hunger-relief organization, Feeding America. Servicing the Boulder and Broomfield Counties on Colorado’s Front Range, Community Food Share distributed 10 million pounds of food in 2017, equal to 22,500 meals a day. Along with 41 partner agencies, Community Food Share distributes food with an onsite pantry floor, mobile pantry truck, and Elder Share program. 75% of the food distributed by the food bank is fresh produce, dairy, and other high-protein items. Brianna works as the produce and gleaning volunteer coordinator, engaging volunteers in growing and harvesting local produce for the food bank.

In efforts to bolster community engagement with the Garden Share program, and offer more garden support to food bank shoppers, Brianna coordinated two Master Gardener events this summer. Piloting Q&A days, Brianna measured how the general public and food bank shoppers engaged with Master Gardeners that were hosted at the food bank. After organizing a very successful Spring Plant Day in early June – where food bank shoppers were able to take home free plant starts and soil – Brianna wanted to continue building garden resources for food-insecure individuals.

The first event, held in June, hosted two Master Gardeners outside the food bank pantry main doors. The Master Gardeners answered questions and provided input about plant pests, and the inevitable challenges of gardening in Colorado. They also had garden print resources in English and Spanish, which Brianna found through the Los Angeles Master Gardener Extension. Luckily this event was a “test,” and while less than 15 people showed up for questions, Brianna received feedback from the Master Gardeners and planned for the second event.

For the second Q&A, Brianna worked on securing donated seeds – as an incentive and interactive piece for visitor engagement. Last week, with more than 300 seed packets on hand, Brianna and the Master Gardeners set up for a busy morning. The flow of visitors was steady to the Master Gardener table, and people were excited. With signs around the warehouse advertising the event and the seeds (in English and Spanish), many more individuals stopped by the table. Over three hours the two ladies talked to more than 25 food bank shoppers, handing away literally hundreds of seeds in the process! More than 250 seed packets went home with individuals. The Master Gardeners were incredibly helpful in showing people varieties they could plant now and next year.


Not only were many seeds distributed, but specific questions answered as well. Brianna created flyers promoting the event around the food bank shopping area – encouraging participants to visit the Master Gardeners if they had questions. One young boy came prepared. He showed up to the table with a red flower in a small pot, wanting to know what it was. He had seen this flower at a lake near his home, which is quite far from the food bank, and brought it with him on the families’ next visit to Community Food Share. Along with his brother, this young gardener also brought home many seeds for his garden, incredibly excited after a visit with the Master Gardeners.

One of the dedicated gardening volunteers with the Garden Share program, also turns out to be a Master Gardener, and helps with many events at the food bank. The volunteer, Carol, reported back to Brianna that at least 10 people had mentioned the plants that they had received from a Spring Plant giveaway day on June 1st. The Spring Plant Day was the first event Brianna had organized (continuing on with first-year VISTA’s event) with Master Gardeners, and wanted to continue providing their wonderful resources to the gardeners that visit the food bank. After piloting two Q&A days this summer, Brianna is excited to work on a framework for the year-three VISTA, suggesting further partnerships with the Master Gardeners next year, and for many years to come!

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