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Urban Abundance

The Importance of Food Sovereignty: Earth, Self, and Community

18.04.2019 in AmeriCorps VISTA, Harvest Against Hunger, SW WA, Urban Abundance, Washington Site

Harvest Against Hunger VISTA Lynsey Horne serves as program coordinator of Urban Abundance, a program of Slow Food SW WA in Vancouver, WA. Slow Food SW WA is an international organization that advocates for good, clean, fair food for all, and their program Urban Abundance’s mission is to engage neighbors in the maintenance, harvest, and creation of edible landscapes that are accessible to everyone. Urban Abundance is currently partnered with five fruit tree orchards in the Vancouver area to coordinate the seasonal maintenance, harvest, and donation of the fruit to the food bank, and holds workshops and other events throughout the year to engage community members in becoming engineers of their own food sovereignty.

Food sovereignty: it’s something you don’t know you have until it’s gone (or vice versa). In Clark County, 13% of residents and 19% of children are classified as “food insecure,” meaning they experience a lack of access to “enough food for an active and healthy life” (USDA). Food sovereignty, on the other hand, is “the right of peoples to healthy and culturally appropriate food produced through ecologically sound and sustainable methods, and their right to define their own food and agriculture systems” (Food Secure Canada). The industrial food system does not currently have much focus on culturally appropriate and ecologically sustainable food production methods. As such, people are more disconnected from where their food comes than ever before, and literal tons of the food that are being produced is going to waste every day. Since 2010, Urban Abundance has been attempting to address some of these issues locally by encouraging the stewardship of Vancouver’s urban orchards, promoting individual food sovereignty, and donating fresh, healthy food to those who are in need.

Sometimes, food sovereignty involves getting a little dirty. Urban Abundance has been kicking off the year with work parties in Foley Community Orchard- a spring pruning workshop in partnership with Vancouver Urban Forestry, and a sheet-mulching event to smother weeds and amend the soil. These maintenance events in the off-seasons nourish the connection to the ecosystems that provide this abundance for us. The healthier these orchards are come harvest time ensures that the freshest, local fruit that is possible is donated to those in need. Fruit trees are very important to Vancouver’s history as well; with Fort Vancouver being an early trading hub in the Pacific Northwest, the community orchards represent early settlers’ success at cultivating a rich local agricultural system that can hopefully be sustained indefinitely.

By improving access to the local abundance in Vancouver, Urban Abundance hopes to contribute to a healthier society by making it easier for food insecure individuals to make healthy choices & take control of their own food sovereignty.

Looking forward, a workshop series that focuses on the wide range of topics involved in food sovereignty will be held throughout this year: sustainable gardening, composting, seed saving, orchard care, and more. The first workshop of the year, Promoting Pollinators with Mason Bee Homes is coming up on May 4 with an expert coming to speak on the importance of pollinators and do a demonstration on bee box building, the results of which will be installed with mason bees in an orchard.

All these events, whether they are educational or more physical in nature, provide a great opportunity to learn, build community, and connect people in the area to a source of local food and sustainable methods for home cultivation, hopefully paving the way for a more food sovereign community.

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Welcome, Lynsey!

21.03.2019 in AmeriCorps VISTA, Harvest Against Hunger, SW WA, Urban Abundance, Washington Site

Lynsey Renee Horne is an Auburn University graduate with a B.S. in Interdisciplinary Studies, emphases on natural resource economics, ecology, and sustainability. Throughout college, as she learned more about some major environmental justice and policy issues that society is dealing with today, she set her sights on doing a term of service after earning her BS and before she attends graduate school. Long passionate about environmental issues and devastated to see the state of food systems the way they currently exist, she was very excited to see an AmeriCorps position that focuses on alleviating both food waste and food insecurity in one fell swoop.

Lynsey is serving with Harvest Against Hunger at Urban Abundance (a program of Slow Food SW WA) in Vancouver, Washington. Since 2010, UA has focused on caring for and harvesting from several community orchards in the Vancouver area, and harvested 20,000 pounds of fresh produce to donate to Clark County Food Bank last year! UA’s mission is to engage neighbors in the maintenance, harvest, and creation of edible landscapes that are accessible to everyone, to support clean, fair food for all .

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A New Vision for Urban Abundance

06.02.2019 in AmeriCorps VISTA, Harvest Against Hunger, SW WA, Urban Abundance, Washington Site

Harvest Against Hunger VISTA Allie Van Nostran serves with Urban Abundance, a program of Slow Food Southwest Washington in Vancouver. Slow Food International seeks to rescue local food traditions and promote “clean, fair food for all.” To this end, Urban Abundance engages volunteers in harvest and stewardship of community and backyard orchards across Clark County. The fresh fruit is rescued from the waste stream and shared with hungry neighbors who need it most.

It’s a time of great transition for Urban Abundance! A Year 2 VISTA has been hired and will start within the month, bringing new ideas and energy. After a recent strategic planning session, the UA committee of the Slow Food Board has developed an exciting new vision for community-driven food security in Clark County.

Urban Abundance has been helping to maintain and harvest fruit trees in Clark County since 2010. In the early years, Urban Abundance occasionally offered activities geared toward local food production in general (eg edible landscaping and seed ball workshops) in addition to fruit tree gleaning. These activities were well-received and well-attended, but eventually dropped off as the organization focus narrowed on fruit tree care and harvest.

In early January, the Urban Abundance committee gathered to review the Strategic Plan for the organization. They took a hard look at the actual needs of the community and recognized that, despite the efforts of the emergency food system, lack of access to fresh, whole foods (beyond just fruit) remains widespread. They also acknowledged that, while there are other local groups that promote food security, teach home-growing or even fruit tree care, none seem to focus on gleaning, foraging, or public edible landscaping as avenues to create universal access.

The committee agreed that Urban Abundance should expand its scope beyond fruit again, embracing and promoting all kinds of local, non-commercial food production. Considering long-term sustainability, they determined that, rather than seeking to grow and sustain the organization itself indefinitely, the main goal of Urban Abundance should be to promote successful models and build community leadership for a decentralized, self-perpetuating free food economy.

The revised mission of Urban Abundance is “to engage neighbors in the creation, maintenance, and harvest of edible landscapes that are accessible to all.” This means working with individuals, families and public or private entities to:
– teach neighbors how to cultivate and harvest edible plants and how to forage edible plants in the landscape
– establish more public edible landscapes (eg front yard foraging gardens, community gardens/food forests, edible plants in parks or public rights-of-way, etc.)
– build relationships and processes to facilitate harvesting and sharing surplus produce wherever it may be found 

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Gleaning with Urban Abundance

17.08.2018 in AmeriCorps VISTA, Gleaning, Harvest Against Hunger, Urban Abundance, Washington Site

Harvest Against Hunger VISTA Allie Van Nostran serves with Urban Abundance, a project of Slow Food Southwest Washington in Vancouver. Slow Food International seeks to rescue local food traditions and promote “clean, fair food for all.” To this end, Urban Abundance engages volunteers in harvest and stewardship of four community orchards across Clark County. The fresh fruit is rescued from the waste stream and shared with hungry neighbors who need it most.

 

 

Harvest season is well underway in Clark County, Washington! Urban Abundance is hard at work connecting with tree owners, recruiting volunteers and organizing harvest parties to harvest and share fresh fruit. In just two weeks, Urban Abundance has held three harvest events, drawing 25 volunteers altogether. All in all, Urban Abundance has harvested over 800 pounds of fruit, donating over 600 pounds to the Clark County Food Bank and other local pantries. Volunteers are invited to share in the harvest, and buggy/scabby/damaged fruit that can’t be donated is given away, left for wildlife, composted, or donated to the WSU Extension for fruit pest research!

 

 

Volunteers and tree owners have been enthusiastic and appreciative. After a recent harvest event, one volunteer recommended Urban Abundance on Facebook, saying, “What a great concept! Reduce food waste while providing much-needed nutrition to families in Clark County. Can’t say enough about how awesome Urban Abundance is!”

 

 

Another said, “It’s a win-win: good stuff gets donated to food banks and you get to take some home.” 

 

 

One tree owner, who works the graveyard shift, was inside asleep while Urban Abundance volunteers harvested her apple tree. The next day, she texted, “I got off early this morning – still dark – so couldn’t see much, but it *looked* like a lot of apples had been picked. Jaw dropped when I took a look when it got light. Wow! 200 lbs! You guys did a great job, and no, I didn’t hear a thing!”

 

 

Volunteer registration and calls and emails about local fruit trees are pouring in. Pear harvest is in full swing at this point, and Urban Abundance will be holding double daily harvests for the next two weeks to thoroughly harvest two large Bartlett pear orchards in the area. They anticipate many dozens of volunteers and multiple tons of pears for the Food Bank by the time all is said and done! With the support of Harvest Against Hunger, Urban Abundance continues to build community awareness and support for this important project and increase access to fresh, local fruit in Clark County.

 

 

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