Rotary First Harvest | Community Garden
6
archive,tag,tag-community-garden,tag-6,ajax_updown_fade,page_not_loaded,,large,shadow3

Community Garden Tag

Filling in the Gaps: Building A Refugee Community Garden

21.08.2019 in AmeriCorps VISTA, Harvest VISTA, IRC, Volunteering, Washington Site

“Harvest Against Hunger Americorps VISTA Hailey Baker serves at the International Rescue Committee in SeaTac, WA. The IRC helps people whose lives and livelihoods are shattered by conflict and disaster to survive, recover, and gain control of their future. Hailey works with the New Roots program, a community garden and food access program within the IRC that helps individuals and families adjust to their new home through gardening, nutrition education, orientation to U.S. food systems, and youth leadership activities.”

A rainy morning greeted Harvest VISTA Hailey Baker on the morning of August 10th, a day destined to be dirty and tiring. She and her team at the International Rescue Committee had been putting in long hours at St. James Episcopal Church in Kent, WA, the site of the IRC’s newest refugee community garden. Over 600 feet of irrigation lines had been installed at the site the week before, and the open trenches in which they sat waited patiently to be refilled.

Hailey had organized one final work party to finish the trench refill, reaching out to the IRC’s long list of on-call volunteers to come out and help. When Hailey drove up to the site with a van full of tools at 9:30am, the rain was just starting to ease, the sun poking its way through the clouds inch by inch. She half expected the rain to scare away the 17 volunteers who had signed up to help.

She needn’t have worried. By quarter past 10am, 15 of the 17 volunteers had shown up, eager to work. They all grabbed shovels and pickaxes and jumped right in, slinging dirt from nearby piles into the gaping irrigation trenches. As they worked, they chatted and laughed, amazed at how much they all had in common. Stories of travel, jobs, hometowns, and politics floated around the site. Strangers only hours before, by the end of the work party everyone had made at least one new friend while toiling in the dirt. During the mid-day break, Hailey led the group over to a nearby patch of blackberry bushes, where some volunteers picked fresh blackberries for the very first time.

By the end of the work party, nearly all of the remaining open trenches had been filled. Hailey was pleased to see all the work they had put in, but she was even more pleased by the moment of community they had all shared that morning. How better to build a community garden than in community?

no comment

Harvest Share program promotes gardening education on the Palouse

14.08.2019 in AmeriCorps VISTA, Community Action Center, Harvest Against Hunger, Harvest VISTA, Washington Site

Harvest Against Hunger Capacity Awareness VISTA Robyn Glessner serves at the Community Action Center (CAC) in Pullman, which has been an endless proponent and advocate for ending hunger through sustainable food production and community collaboration throughout the Palouse for 30 years. One of their mottos is, “solving local needs with local solutions”, which perfectly frames my desire to work in an area that provides relief with sustainable solutions at its center. The office also provides energy assistance, housing, and weatherization services, as well as a food pantry, community garden, and computers for WorkSource applicants. In tandem with the desire to connect local food-insecure communities with the food producers in the region, the CAC and the first-year VISTA created the Palouse Tables Project. Within the work of this project, the regional community had expressed a desire for educational opportunities open to the public focused on self-sufficiency, in the form of preparing and preserving their own foods and gardening. Along these lines, the Palouse Tables Project will continue by providing opportunities for education courses and materials by adapting curriculum and coursework and then training local volunteers to teach these skills to the public.

In June of this year, the Harvest Against Hunger VISTA Robyn Glessner began a Harvest Share program for local gardeners to meet once every two weeks to share their produce and gardening stories with one another. This program was created in tandem with the Koppel Community Garden in Pullman, where the host site Community Action Center has matched four clients with their own plot to garden on and grow their own food. These plots were generously donated for this purpose by a handful of fellow community members and gardeners. The Harvest Share program brings together clients and other community members from all walks of life to come together and find unity in growing food. The Koppel Community Garden board helped to cultivate this opportunity not only by facilitating gardeners to donate plots but by also including the opportunity to sign up for the harvest share within their general gardener application. Ten of the gardeners who grow at Koppel have signed up to participate in the harvest share for the coming weeks.

At this Harvest Share, gardeners brought in fresh sage, mint, chives, scallions, lacinato kale, cherries, strawberries, green garlic, salad greens, and garlic scapes. One of the community members shared that they had planted their garden this year in order to participate in this program and next year they want to plant an additional row or two so that more and more of our community members have access to fresh produce. This sentiment is at the heart of the work that the Community Food group at the Community Action Center moves to accomplish. Along with fruitful discussion made about each individuals gardening experiences this growing season, advice and experiences were swapped as well as boxes of produce. Each participant was able to pick and choose what they wanted to bring home with them. The Community Action Center provided recipe cards describing dishes that used the produce that was brought including such things as green garlic sauce, freezer jam, and chia jam. The participants from the Harvest Share were invited back for the next share at the Community Action Center, hoping to garner more and more participants in the weeks to come.

no comment

Discovering Food Justice: Under the Overgrown Garden

25.07.2019 in AmeriCorps VISTA, Harvest Against Hunger, OIC of Washington, Volunteering, Washington Site

Harvest VISTA Gleaning Coordinator VISTA Mary Pearl Ivy serves at OIC of Washington, a non-profit organization providing community services through federal, state and local funding sources. Mary Pearl’s focus is with the Emergency Food Assistance Program (TEFAP), which aims to supplement the diets of low-income Americans including the elderly by providing them with food and nutrition assistance at no cost. In addition to the farm to table communications for the food bank, Mary Pearl recruit’s volunteers to work within a community garden, in hopes of providing access to knowledge and resources for individuals to grow their own fresh foods.

Within the first couple weeks of her service, Mary Pearl hosted three large groups of volunteers to revive the completely grass encroached community garden; and the results were mind-blowing. What started as a hands-on volunteer opportunity, with some games and a snack turned into a dialogue about food justice and social justice! The three groups of students with Quo’s Discovery Washington program visited OIC in addition to local orchards and organizations in the community. They were introduced to the concept of migrant workers in the field and wanted to know more about where their food comes from and what it means for a community to have food insecurity. The VISTA asked one of her colleagues that works with the National Farm Workers Association to come in and speak on the opportunities that they provide, as well as his own experiences in the field. The attentive observations and inputs that these seventh graders had to share were inspiring. One of the teachers even mentioned that the world was not giving youth enough credit.

The VISTA was especially touched when the students asked to stay and work in the garden longer. The students were plotting ways to help fundraise, stop food insecurity, and misconceptions in this community and their own. After all their hard work in the garden, it is now open enough to host younger groups of volunteers as well as community members. Thanks, Que for connecting us to these amazing, hardworking students and teachers!

no comment

Healing Gardens: Making the Namaste Community Garden Accessible to All

20.06.2019 in AmeriCorps VISTA, Harvest Against Hunger, IRC, Washington Site

“Harvest Against Hunger Americorps VISTA Hailey Baker serves at the International Rescue Committee in SeaTac, WA. The IRC helps people whose lives and livelihoods are shattered by conflict and disaster to survive, recover, and gain control of their future. Hailey works with the New Roots program, a community garden and food access program within the IRC that helps individuals and families adjust to their new home through gardening, nutrition education, orientation to U.S. food systems, and youth leadership activities.”

The Namaste Community Garden in Tukwila, WA is a flurry of activity at this time of year. The growers, the majority of whom came to the U.S. as refugees from Bhutan, Nepal, and Burma, spend hours diligently digging, planting, weeding, and watering their plots.

One plot, usually bursting with life-giving food at this point in the season, sits overgrown and empty. Its keeper, a dedicated Bhutanese grower named Ram, recently lost both of his legs and is no longer able to garden. He still visits the garden often, riding his wheelchair along the main woodchipped path, but his inability to garden and connect with the land has left him feeling isolated.

At the same time, a group of ELL students at nearby Foster High School are hard at work on a big group project. The topic for the project is a wheelchair-accessible garden bed design. At the close of the project, the students presented their work to officials of the City of Tukwila, who were so impressed with the outcome that they pledged to make a donation to put the design into practice. Little did they know that a need for an ADA garden design was so close at hand.

With materials donated by community members and the City of Tukwila, New Roots and the Foster High students came together on June 6th and 7th to install permeable pavers and to construct two ADA-approved raised garden beds on the plot belonging to Ram. The pavers will allow his wheelchair to roll easily into the plot, and the raised beds will be tall enough for him to comfortably garden. The students, Foster High, and New Roots staff, and representatives from the City of Tukwila worked for several hours each day, doing everything from clearing space for the pavers to sawing wood planks for the beds.

Last week, Ram planted the first shoots of the season in the new raised beds. His wheelchair rolls easily over the pavers, and he can comfortably reach the soil in the bed from where he sits. The journey to healing has only just begun, but with his connection to the garden restored anything is possible.

no comment

Building True Accessibility

27.03.2019 in AmeriCorps VISTA, Food Bank, Food for Others, Harvest Against Hunger, National Site, Virginia

Maheyaar Barron is the Gleaning and Produce Recovery Coordinator at Food for Others, a food bank and pantry located in Fairfax, Virginia. The organization services the northern region of the state through a multitude of programs such as emergency food aid, weekend meals for elementary school children, neighborhood site deliveries, and community partner support. The gleaning program, which began in 2017 in partnership with Harvest Against Hunger, connects local growers to families in need, bringing in fresh produce directly from farms, farmers markets, and community gardens.

As the Food for Others gleaning program enters its third year, summer fruits and vegetables have become commonplace at all levels of distribution. The 2018 season brought in over 43,000 pounds of produce, giving clients fresh and nutritious options to take home to their families. The donations are distributed through the choice section, where referrals can shop for their food, as well as through neighborhood site distribution. Using these methods, Food for Others is working to increase food equity within its service region.

 As the supply side of the equation is slowly improved, demand is still very complicated. Client preferences do not always align with available items, and some donations stay on the shelf, untouched. These inclinations are due to a variety of factors: Need for culturally appropriate food, lack of cooking skills or time to cook, nutrition education, the unfamiliarity of the produce, etc.

Efforts to provide more culturally relevant produce through the gleaning program are currently underway– the emphasis on community gardens. Belvedere Elementary School, which boasts multiple green spaces, has been looking for opportunities to further educate its students on social service. Using a produce preference survey conducted by the first VISTA, Amy Reagan, Belvedere will soon be growing high demand produce for the food bank. Local fifth grade girl scouts are taking similar measures by looking to cultivate a plot at their own school. As more and more gardens sign up to be a part of the Grow a Row program, Food for Others will be able to more optimally target its clients’ needs and decrease the amount of food left on the shelf.

To mitigate other factors preventing equal access to fresh produce, Food for Others is offering two eight week cooking courses in partnership with both a nearby low-income housing unit and the Virginia Extension office. The classes will be held at the housing unit, and will promote nutritious foods, cooking skills, food budgeting, and safe food handling. Through its connection with a local CSA, Waterpenny Farm, Food for Others will provide each attendee with a share of fresh produce. Recipes will center around the items in each weekly basket, with the intention of increasing participants’ knowledge of the different fruits and vegetables and how to prepare them. Upon completion of the course Virginia Extension will provide each member with an eighteen piece set of cooking pots, removing a high cost up-front barrier.

Access to healthy produce has many layers. Food for Others is attempting to balance meeting clients’ preferences with recognizing and combatting the systemic way in which marginalized communities have been primed to reject healthy options. This will require both time and a multifaceted approach.

no comment

HAH VISTA in Virginia Builds Inaugural Community Garden

03.07.2017 in Uncategorized

Harvest Against Hunger launched its National Pilot in November of 2016, and the projects, in Virginia, Colorado, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, and Mississippi, are in full swing! Here is an update from Virginia:

Harvest Against Hunger VISTA Amy Reagan is placed with Food for Others in Fairfax, Virginia. Amy managed the planning, volunteer coordination, and construction of Food for Others’ inaugural food bank garden, which was built at Peace Lutheran Church and is located a few miles away from the warehouse. Volunteers constructed the garden, and the gate was constructed later by a youth group. All of the produce that will be grown is client requested, based on a survey Amy conducted at the beginning of her term. Crops include: salsa peppers, tomatoes, zucchini,  bell peppers, beans, and cucumbers.

Volunteers building the beds


Completed beds


Amy Reagan and Annie Turner of Food for Others

SaveSave

no comment